It’s mail time once again, as 64 Trump Collection: Alice no Waku Waku Trump World just arrived yesterday. Developed by Bottom Up, a company perhaps best known on the system for their 64 Oozumou duology of sumo games, this is simply a collection of card game favorites featuring Alice in Wonderland-related trappings. 

Let’s get this out of the way quickly: yes, Alice no Waku Waku’s graphical stylings are similar to what you’ll find in Paper Mario. It features paper-thin characters in a book-based 3D environment, after all, and it’s awfully cute. However, it actually predates Paper Mario by a whole 2 years, so please go ahead and put the mockery-based pitchforks back in the closet. It’s certainly not as impressive as Paper Mario, but it’s definitely more than impressive for a small Japanese 3rd-party N64 game dev in 1998.

Outside of its titular Alice aesthetics, it delivers on its basic premise: card-based games on a cart-based game pak. Unlike some similar titles, it’s a mix of both single-player and multi-player card games- and there’s also a story mode that focuses heavily on the latter. Among the 20 or so games, it’s mostly stuff you’ve heard of, like Doubt, Solitaire, and Speed; though there seems to be a few Japanese card games thrown in that you’re likely as familiar with as I am.

Is Alice no Waku Waku worth your time? In the age of the internet and smartphones, probably not- at least, if you’re just looking to play some of your favorite card games. It may very much be worth your time if you view it as a unique and intriguing novelty, though, especially to see its Japanese take on the Lewis Carroll classic. Heck, it’s honestly interesting enough just to see the proto-Paper Mario style in action, if you’re into that kind of thing. Consider giving it 15 minutes or so sometime when you’re bored, and don’t be surprised if those minutes turn out to be significantly more entertaining than expected.

Backflipping your way to success in Twilight City, from Wave Race 64 by Nintendo.

Backflipping your way to success in Twilight City, from Wave Race 64 by Nintendo.

Taking a seaside stroll in Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon, by Konami.

Taking a seaside stroll in Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon, by Konami.

The craft-y cast of Wave Race 64, by Nintendo.

The craft-y cast of Wave Race 64, by Nintendo.

Goemon Impact gets summoned to the scene, from Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon by Konami.

Goemon Impact gets summoned to the scene, from Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon by Konami.

The complete Japanese box art for F-Zero X, by Nintendo.

Jaunty, the overly loquacious guardian of the Marrow Gates in Shadow Man by Acclaim Studios Teeside.

Jaunty, the overly loquacious guardian of the Marrow Gates in Shadow Man by Acclaim Studios Teeside.

The dry, subtle wit of Duke Nukem: Zero Hour by Eurocom/3D Realms.

The dry, subtle wit of Duke Nukem: Zero Hour by Eurocom/3D Realms.

Descending into Deadside, from Shadow Man by Acclaim Studios Teeside.

Descending into Deadside, from Shadow Man by Acclaim Studios Teeside.

Assorted highlights from Going Down, the Titanic-y secret stage found in Duke Nukem: Zero Hour by Eurocom/3D Realms.